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Year: 2020

16 Sep 2020
Disruptive technology can prevent stagnation, improve efficiency and competitiveness

Disruptive technology can prevent stagnation, improve efficiency and competitiveness

Disruption in business is inevitable, and it is up to operators and owners to embrace the changes that come with innovation — or risk stagnation amidst growing inefficiencies.

Cutting-edge technology exists to advance senior housing providers with consolidating data, analyzing trends, and improving resident satisfaction and security, but only for those willing to adopt and embrace the disruption. Unfortunately, many will avoid innovative trends and stay rooted to the old ways of doing business. While many are lagging in crossing the chasm, those who have taken the leap will have the leading edge over competitors. The rewards of adoption are greater than the risks of avoidance.

Disruptive technology has had a transformative effect on the senior housing industry. Right now, cloud-based data platforms are being used throughout many senior living organizations to provide a centralized database across departments within communities and the entire portfolio. A repository of resident data will assist operators with actionable insights and assist with projecting future trends.

More and more community leaders have implemented high-speed WiFi, resident engagement tools, advanced surveillance and data collection strategies. Early adopters have taken the first steps toward committing to technology and increasing their competitive position, but too many organizations still are avoiding modern business intelligence tools. Without the ability to effectively parse and standardize the data across disparate systems within a community and across the entire portfolio, leaders are missing the opportunity to take their operations to the next level of excellence.

The senior housing and skilled nursing sectors are just as vulnerable to unexpected trends, economic shifts and changes in state and federal regulations they always have been. It’s not enough to have access to key data; the information must be digestible and swiftly delivered for a community to remain profitable and efficient. This truth is not going to change in the future; it will only become more prominent as more communities increase technology investments in search of greater productivity.

Fight or flight

Today, technology is developed at such a fast rate that it’s easy to fall behind the curve or want to run from it altogether, but this development is only accelerating. Operators are left with two main choices: fight and make the necessary changes to succeed, or flee and avoid embracing the disruption while competitors grow more agile and knowledgeable about how to strategize and optimize operations.

Consider the benefits granted by business intelligence and performance data management tools — and the ways a community is hindered without them. It is crucial for communities to be able to project their net operating income on a monthly basis, particularly during periods of economic uncertainty. Having access to historical data is a key element of this ability, but breaking those data down into relevant, bite-sized chunks can be time-consuming.

Gathering and understanding relevant departmental and community data becomes more labor intensive over time as data sets grow in scale and technology becomes more precise. That is why it is important for operators to take on technology that minimizes the time spent on reporting data and maximizing their available resources to address community needs. Cutting-edge business intelligence tools now can display key data through visual dashboards or numerical reports, allowing community leaders to make accurate projections for the future in record time. Once freed from the processes of collecting, organizing and deciphering data, operators can focus on what they do best: providing the best possible care and services for residents.

Conversely, those who avoid the implementation of advanced business intelligence tools will have a difficult time noticing inefficiency during a down market and will struggle to scale their business as the economy improves. Without the breadth, depth and speed provided by tools such as these, operators will have to allocate more time to understand market conditions and trends.

Historic data, here and now

Operating with an efficient business intelligence tool is becoming less of a luxury and more of a necessity. The biggest issue facing senior housing at the crossroads of technology and innovation is avoiding data-driven technology while others adopt it into their scope of meeting initiatives.

An efficient in-depth analysis of historic data undoubtedly will become the cornerstone of competition in the senior living sector. The real value of data analysis can be difficult to quantify from the outside looking in, so consider a few examples of how a senior living community can improve operations through the adoption of business intelligence technology:

  • Improving occupancy: Analysis of the ebbs and flows of historical occupancy trends is essential to projections and can be used to improve marketing efforts and aid in strategic planning to meet census goals.
  • Managing labor: Business intelligence tools can help manage your community’s labor demands and the care needs of residents amidst economic fluctuation as well as unprecedented events.
  • Monitoring resident care and safety: Managing life safety events such as fall risks, fire drills, care assessments and other factors can help providers respond proactively and improving quality of care with access to real-time data for prompt decision-making.

The longer a community waits before embracing the disruption of technology to gain the operational efficiencies and data-driven results, the more challenges it will face in keeping up with the industry. Competition waits for no one, and the best defense is a good offense. While one community avoids the power of innovative technology, the other is adopting the disruption for stability, growth and success.

source: https://www.mcknightsseniorliving.com/home/columns/marketplace-columns/disruptive-technology-can-prevent-stagnation-improve-efficiency-competitiveness/

12 Sep 2020
Disruptive technology can prevent stagnation, improve efficiency and competitiveness

Disruptive technology can prevent stagnation, improve efficiency and competitiveness

Disruption in business is inevitable, and it is up to operators and owners to embrace the changes that come with innovation — or risk stagnation amidst growing inefficiencies.

Cutting-edge technology exists to advance senior housing providers with consolidating data, analyzing trends, and improving resident satisfaction and security, but only for those willing to adopt and embrace the disruption. Unfortunately, many will avoid innovative trends and stay rooted to the old ways of doing business. While many are lagging in crossing the chasm, those who have taken the leap will have the leading edge over competitors. The rewards of adoption are greater than the risks of avoidance.

Disruptive technology has had a transformative effect on the senior housing industry. Right now, cloud-based data platforms are being used throughout many senior living organizations to provide a centralized database across departments within communities and the entire portfolio. A repository of resident data will assist operators with actionable insights and assist with projecting future trends.

More and more community leaders have implemented high-speed WiFi, resident engagement tools, advanced surveillance and data collection strategies. Early adopters have taken the first steps toward committing to technology and increasing their competitive position, but too many organizations still are avoiding modern business intelligence tools. Without the ability to effectively parse and standardize the data across disparate systems within a community and across the entire portfolio, leaders are missing the opportunity to take their operations to the next level of excellence.

The senior housing and skilled nursing sectors are just as vulnerable to unexpected trends, economic shifts and changes in state and federal regulations they always have been. It’s not enough to have access to key data; the information must be digestible and swiftly delivered for a community to remain profitable and efficient. This truth is not going to change in the future; it will only become more prominent as more communities increase technology investments in search of greater productivity.

Fight or flight

Today, technology is developed at such a fast rate that it’s easy to fall behind the curve or want to run from it altogether, but this development is only accelerating. Operators are left with two main choices: fight and make the necessary changes to succeed, or flee and avoid embracing the disruption while competitors grow more agile and knowledgeable about how to strategize and optimize operations.

Consider the benefits granted by business intelligence and performance data management tools — and the ways a community is hindered without them. It is crucial for communities to be able to project their net operating income on a monthly basis, particularly during periods of economic uncertainty. Having access to historical data is a key element of this ability, but breaking those data down into relevant, bite-sized chunks can be time-consuming.

Gathering and understanding relevant departmental and community data becomes more labor intensive over time as data sets grow in scale and technology becomes more precise. That is why it is important for operators to take on technology that minimizes the time spent on reporting data and maximizing their available resources to address community needs. Cutting-edge business intelligence tools now can display key data through visual dashboards or numerical reports, allowing community leaders to make accurate projections for the future in record time. Once freed from the processes of collecting, organizing and deciphering data, operators can focus on what they do best: providing the best possible care and services for residents.

Conversely, those who avoid the implementation of advanced business intelligence tools will have a difficult time noticing inefficiency during a down market and will struggle to scale their business as the economy improves. Without the breadth, depth and speed provided by tools such as these, operators will have to allocate more time to understand market conditions and trends.

Historic data, here and now

Operating with an efficient business intelligence tool is becoming less of a luxury and more of a necessity. The biggest issue facing senior housing at the crossroads of technology and innovation is avoiding data-driven technology while others adopt it into their scope of meeting initiatives.

An efficient in-depth analysis of historic data undoubtedly will become the cornerstone of competition in the senior living sector. The real value of data analysis can be difficult to quantify from the outside looking in, so consider a few examples of how a senior living community can improve operations through the adoption of business intelligence technology:

  • Improving occupancy: Analysis of the ebbs and flows of historical occupancy trends is essential to projections and can be used to improve marketing efforts and aid in strategic planning to meet census goals.
  • Managing labor: Business intelligence tools can help manage your community’s labor demands and the care needs of residents amidst economic fluctuation as well as unprecedented events.
  • Monitoring resident care and safety: Managing life safety events such as fall risks, fire drills, care assessments and other factors can help providers respond proactively and improving quality of care with access to real-time data for prompt decision-making.

The longer a community waits before embracing the disruption of technology to gain the operational efficiencies and data-driven results, the more challenges it will face in keeping up with the industry. Competition waits for no one, and the best defense is a good offense. While one community avoids the power of innovative technology, the other is adopting the disruption for stability, growth and success.

Source: https://www.mcknightsseniorliving.com/home/columns/marketplace-columns/disruptive-technology-can-prevent-stagnation-improve-efficiency-competitiveness/

10 Sep 2020
Physicist: The Entire Universe Might Be a Neural Network

Physicist: The Entire Universe Might Be a Neural Network

It’s not every day that we come across a paper that attempts to redefine reality.

But in a provocative preprint uploaded to arXiv this summer, a physics professor at the University of Minnesota Duluth named Vitaly Vanchurin attempts to reframe reality in a particularly eye-opening way — suggesting that we’re living inside a massive neural network that governs everything around us. In other words, he wrote in the paper, it’s a “possibility that the entire universe on its most fundamental level is a neural network.”

For years, physicists have attempted to reconcile quantum mechanics and general relativity. The first posits that time is universal and absolute, while the latter argues that time is relative, linked to the fabric of space-time.

In his paper, Vanchurin argues that artificial neural networks can “exhibit approximate behaviors” of both universal theories. Since quantum mechanics “is a remarkably successful paradigm for modeling physical phenomena on a wide range of scales,” he writes, “it is widely believed that on the most fundamental level the entire universe is governed by the rules of quantum mechanics and even gravity should somehow emerge from it.”

“We are not just saying that the artificial neural networks can be useful for analyzing physical systems or for discovering physical laws, we are saying that this is how the world around us actually works,” reads the paper’s discussion. “With this respect it could be considered as a proposal for the theory of everything, and as such it should be easy to prove it wrong.”

Futurism: Your paper argues that the universe might fundamentally be a neural network. How would you explain your reasoning to someone who didn’t know very much about neural networks or physics?

Vitaly Vanchurin: There are two ways to answer your question.

The first way is to start with a precise model of neural networks and then to study the behavior of the network in the limit of a large number of neurons. What I have shown is that equations of quantum mechanics describe pretty well the behavior of the system near equilibrium and equations of classical mechanics describes pretty well how the system further away from the equilibrium. Coincidence? May be, but as far as we know quantum and classical mechanics is exactly how the physical world works.

Then one might argue that there are not two, but three phenomena that need to be unified: quantum mechanics, general relativity and observers. 99% of physicists would tell you that quantum mechanics is the main one and everything else should somehow emerge from it, but nobody knows exactly how that can be done. In this paper I consider another possibility that a microscopic neural network is the fundamental structure and everything else, i.e. quantum mechanics, general relativity and macroscopic observers, emerges from it. So far things look rather promising.

What first gave you this idea?

First I just wanted to better understand how deep learning works and so I wrote a paper entitled “Towards a theory of machine learning”. The initial idea was to apply the methods of statistical mechanics to study the behavior of neural networks, but it turned out that in certain limits the learning (or training) dynamics of neural networks is very similar to the quantum dynamics we see in physics. At that time I was (and still is) on a sabbatical leave and decided to explore the idea that the physical world is actually a neural network. The idea is definitely crazy, but if it is crazy enough to be true? That remains to be seen.

Source: https://futurism.com/physicist-entire-universe-neural-network

06 Sep 2020
Coronavirus: The Pandemic Is Changing Our Brains

The Pandemic Is Changing Our Brains

Summary: Coronavirus can cause several significant neurological disorders, and the pandemic has been linked to a rise in people reporting mental health problems such as depression and anxiety. Researchers examine how COVID-19 affects brain and mental health and provides some techniques which can help to improve well-being during the pandemic.

Source: The Conversation

Whether you have contracted COVID-19 or not, your brain is likely to have changed over the past few months. The virus itself can cause a number of neurological problems, along with anxiety and depression. The isolation and worry caused by the pandemic can similarly alter our brain chemistry and cause mood disorders.

In our new paper, published in Neuropsychopharmacology Reviews, we have investigated how to best overcome the brain changes linked to the pandemic.

Let’s start with COVID-19 infection. In addition to mood disorders, common symptoms include fatigue, headaches, memory loss and problems with attention. There may be a number of reasons for these brain changes, including inflammation and cerebrovascular events (a syndrome caused by disruption of blood supply to the brain).

Research suggests that the virus may gain access to the brain via the forebrain’s olfactory bulb, which is important for the processing of smell. Loss of smell is a symptom in many patients with COVID-19.

As part of the system responsible for your sense of smell, the olfactory bulb sends information about smell to be further processed in other brain regions – including the amygdala, orbitofrontal cortex and the hippocampus – which play a major role in emotion, learning and memory.

As well as having extensive connections to other brain regions, the olfactory bulb is rich in the chemical dopamine, which is important for pleasure, motivation and action. It may be that COVID-19 alters the levels of dopamine and other chemicals, such as serotonin and acetylcholine, in the brain, but we can’t say for sure yet. All these chemicals are known to be involved in attention, learning, memory and mood.

These changes in the brain are likely responsible for the mood, fatigue and cognitive changes that are commonly experienced by COVID-19 patients. This in turn may underlie the reported symptoms of stress, anxiety and depression in patients who have contracted the virus.

But it’s not just people who have contracted the COVID-19 virus that have suffered from increased anxiety and depression during the pandemic. Excessive worry over contracting or spreading the virus to other family members, as well as isolation and loneliness, can also change our brain chemistry.

Repeated stress is a major trigger for persistent inflammation in the body, which can also affect the brain and shrink the hippocampus and therefore affect our emotions. Stress can also affect levels of brain serotonin and cortisol, which can affect our mood. Eventually, these changes can cause symptoms of depression and anxiety.

Brain training

The good thing about the brain, however, is that it is incredibly plastic, which means it is changeable and can compensate for damage. Even serious conditions such as memory loss and depression can be improved by doing things that alter the brain function and its chemistry.

Our paper looks at promising solutions to combat symptoms of stress, anxiety and depression – in COVID-19 patients and others.

We already know that exercise and mindfulness training – techniques that help us stay in the present – are helpful when it comes to combating brain stress. Indeed, studies have shown beneficial functional and structural changes in the brain’s prefrontal cortex (involved in planning and decision making), hippocampus and amygdala following mindfulness training.

This drawing has covid 19 in the head in place of a brain
The novel coronavirus is affecting our brains, whether we’ve caught it or not. Image is adapted from The Conversation news release.

One study showed an enhanced density of grey matter – the tissue containing most of the brain’s cell bodies and a key component of the central nervous system – in the left hippocampus after eight weeks of training (in comparison to controls).

 

Importantly, these are all regions that are impacted by the COVID-19 virus. Additionally, gamified cognitive training can also help improve attention, memory function and increase motivation. Those who have persistent or severe mental health symptoms may require clinical evaluation by a psychologist or psychiatrist. In such cases, there are pharmacological and psychological treatments available, such as antidepressants or cognitive behavioural therapy.

Given that many countries haven’t completely come out of lockdown yet, and there are long delays in accessing healthcare, modern techniques such as wearable devices (activity trackers) and digital platforms (mobile apps), that can be easily integrated into daily life, are promising.

For example, activity trackers can monitor things like heart rate and sleeping patterns, indicating when the wearer may benefit from activities such as meditation, exercise or extra sleep. There are also apps that can help you reduce your stress levels yourself.

These techniques are likely be beneficial to everyone, and may help us to better promote cognitive resilience and mental health – preparing us for future critical events such as global pandemics. As a society, we need to anticipate future challenges to our brain health, cognition and wellbeing. We should be utilising these techniques in schools to promote lifelong resilience starting at an early age.

Funding: Barbara Jacquelyn Sahakian has received funding from the Wallitt Foundation and Eton College. She consults for Cambridge Cognition, Greenfield BioVentures and Cassava Sciences .Cambridge Enterprise has technology transferred Wizard and Decoder to PEAK.

Christelle Langley and Deniz Vatansever do not work for, consult, own shares in or receive funding from any company or organization that would benefit from this article, and have disclosed no relevant affiliations beyond their academic appointment.

Source: https://neurosciencenews.com/coronavirus-brain-16972/

05 Sep 2020

How Leading B2B Companies Invest In Innovation

It was American investor Warren Buffett who said, “We continue to make more money when snoring than when active.”  This line of thought is not lost on many other financial experts who also favor long-term investments and believe “market timing” does not actually yield results and can be stressful, time-consuming, and risky.  In fact, the strategy of long-term investments in the financial market can easily be applied to a B2B organization’s approach to investing in business innovation. 

Consider a 401(k)-retirement savings plan. Ongoing, predictable contributions to a 401(k) account throughout an individual’s career aims to build a long-term, guaranteed path to a comfortable retirement. Likewise, continuous developments and investments in innovation can enable B2B organizations to keep up with, and even proactively address, the needs of a dynamic market.

What History Teaches Us

Past recessions have taught us a few things. Authors Ranjay Gulati, Nitin Nohria, and Franz Wohlgezogen studied the recessions of 1980, 1990, and 2000. In their book, Roaring Out the Depression, they wrote that 17 percent of companies didn’t survive, 74 percent came out the recession the same or weaker, and 9 percent come out stronger. How can we apply lessons learned from these drastic shifts in market leadership?

The keys to coming out of recessions in a better position than you started are seeing and understanding trends, developing a strategic vision around them, then evolving the company around that vision. It means embracing change. It also means making the right, strategic investments into an organization. Enabling it to identify disruptive trends, define successful strategies, simplify or even abandon outdated practices and to embrace new technologies that will enable new practices or business models driving the company closer toward its vision.

How Leading Companies Approach Technology Investments

Although the majority of innovations are driven by business, technology is often a catalyst for change and vital to predicting and proactively responding to trends in the market, across all industries.

According to a 2019 Forrester Consulting Study, digital transformation journeys continue to be a priority for enterprises. These organizations are increasingly optimizing existing processes to improve efficiency, extending processes to capture new value, and transforming business models to gain new revenue streams.

As companies seek competitive advantages and operational improvements, they are prioritizing innovative technologies. As such, leading B2B organizations are implementing or have already implemented innovative technologies to drive digital transformation:

  • Internet of Things: 92 percent
  • Artificial Intelligence: 78 percent
  • Machine Learning: 77 percent
  • Augmented reality/virtual reality: 70 percent
  • Blockchain: 68 percent

According to the study, 92 percent of companies showed a high interest in platforms that unify data collected by, and used across, all intelligent technologies and business processes. Take I-D Foods, for example. This Canadian-based food service distributor continues to invest in advanced digital technologies that expose deep, real-time business insight that helps them better understand and predict demand. The company’s unified approach helped reduce stock, expand product offerings, increase availability and accelerate fulfillment times.

“We are always looking to improve and win more customers,” said Mike Issenman, CTO, ID Foods Corporation. “An important part of that is delivering great service. To achieve our future ambitions, we needed to adopt a platform that could offer deeper operational insight, greater agility, and superb scalability.”

Source: https://www.forbes.com/sites/sap/2020/09/03/how-behavioral-banking-can-drive-financial-literacy-and-inclusion/#ad823c763888

03 Sep 2020
Hurra por el nuevo Medio Oriente

Ben venga il nuovo Medio Oriente

Volevamo un cambiamento nella regione ed ora sta prendendo forma davanti ai nostri occhi. Ma gli eterni detrattori continuano a pestare i piedi chiedendo di insistere sulla strada dello scontro che non ha mai portato nulla di buono a nessuno

Spesso ci preoccupiamo di dettagli banali mentre facciamo fatica a vedere il quadro più ampio. La visita ufficiale della delegazione israeliana negli Emirati Arabi Uniti – giunta su un aereo El Al che ha sorvolato l’Arabia Saudita con il permesso del Regno – è un giorno di festa per Israele.

Volevamo un nuovo Medio Oriente ed ecco che sta prendendo forma davanti ai nostri occhi. Certo, saremmo stati ben felici se anche i palestinesi si fossero uniti a noi. Saremmo stati ben felici di vedere le bandiere israeliane issate anche a Ramallah, come ad Abu Dhabi. Questo non è ancora successo, ma non c’è motivo di lamentarsi del fatto che la bandiera israeliana ha “solo” sorvolato il territorio saudita senza poter scendere su di esso.

I critici insistono a dire che non è successo niente di così eccezionale dal momento che Israele intrattiene già da parecchi anni rapporti più o meno clandestini con vari stati del Golfo. Personalmente ho visitato due stati del Golfo (Bahrain e Qatar) negli anni ’90 e sono persino andato nello Yemen. Ma poi scoppiò la seconda intifada, l’intifada delle stragi suicide, e tutto si è bruscamente fermato. Tutti i rapporti palesi divennero segreti o semplicemente cessarono di esistere. Tornarono a comandare i nemici della normalizzazione, e il perenne ostruzionismo dei palestinesi tornò a dettare le politiche.

1 settembre: funzionari degli Emirati Arabi Uniti salutano la delegazione israeliana a bordo dell’aereo El Al che si appresta a decollare da Abu Dhabi alla volta di Tel Aviv

Ora tutto è cambiato ed è stato detto loro: “basta”. I fautori della normalizzazione hanno rialzato la testa, e non per amore d’sraele ma per i loro propri interessi. Il che è meraviglioso. Quanto vorrei che anche i palestinesi potessero aderire e agire nel loro interesse. Ma preferiscono di gran lunga agire contro se stessi. È diventata per loro una seconda natura: danneggia noi, ma danneggia molto di più loro.

“Ma quante storie! Dopotutto gli Emirati Arabi Uniti sono una dittatura” esclamano alcuni critici. Trovo l’affermazione alquanto bizzarra se pensiamo che arriva dagli stessi che attaccavano e denigravano l’allora presidente degli Stati Uniti George Bush perché cercava di diffondere la buona novella della democrazia, e domandavano chi gli avesse dato tale autorità. Ora gli eterni malcontenti ribaltano la domanda contro Israele. E dunque cosa ci suggeriscono di fare? Rompere i rapporti anche con l’Egitto e la Giordania? Anche quelle non sono democrazie, dopotutto. Si tratta delle stesse persone che si crogiolano nel fango politico palestinese e ci fanno continuamente la predica sulla necessità di riconciliarci con Hamas perché è un movimento “importante” e – secondo loro – ricordare che è un gruppo totalitario, antisemita e sanguinario è solo una scusa per evitare il compromesso e la pace. In realtà costoro una giusta la dicono sui palestinesi: che non dovremmo occuparci più di tanto della posizione dell’entità palestinese nella classifica dei sistemi democratici. E allora facciano il piacere di smetterla di lamentarsi degli altri regimi arabi con cui Israele cerca di andare d’accordo.

Bandiere israeliane, Usa e degli Emirati all’aeroporto di Abu Dhabi

Ma questo nuovo trend all’interno del mondo arabo circa Israele rispecchia una tendenza reale o è soltanto un accordo tra leader che non ha nulla a che fare con l’opinione pubblica araba? Non ci sono ancora sondaggi d’opinione a sostegno di questa ipotesi, ma un’occhiata attenta ai mass-media arabi mostra chiaramente che qualcosa sta succedendo da quelle parti, e non è iniziata con l’accordo Israele-Emirati Arabi Uniti. Chi ha seguito negli anni il Middle East Media Research Institution (MEMRI) sa che si tratta di un processo. Articoli e opinioni che non ci saremmo mai sognati di leggere venti o trent’anni fa vengono oggi pubblicati non solo sui siti arabi che hanno sede in Occidente, ma anche sui principali quotidiani dei paesi arabi. Il famoso giornalista saudita Mashari Althaydi ha scritto che gli Emirati Arabi Uniti hanno raggiunto un “traguardo storico”. L’economista yemenita Manahel Thabet ha pubblicato un articolo in cui elogia i risultati scientifici di Israele e esorta i paesi arabi a cooperare con Israele. Non stanno “abbandonando la causa palestinese”. È qualcosa di molto più profondo e importante. È un mutamento di atteggiamento: la pace perseguita attraverso gli interessi reciproci e la normalizzazione anziché attraverso l’ostilità e i boicottaggi.

I detrattori, anche quelli all’interno di Israele, continuano a pestare i piedi chiedendoci di insistere sulla strada che per quasi un secolo non ha portato i palestinesi a nessun risultato, e invocano sempre più ostruzionismo e boicottaggi. Non hanno mai funzionato, ma che importa? Sono così ciechi nella loro ostilità preconcetta verso Israele che a loro sembra normale persino sostenere la coalizione islamista Qatar-Turchia-Hamas-Iran.

Abbiamo invece bisogno di altre svolte come quella odierna anche con il Sudan e l’Arabia Saudita, con il Bahrain e l’Oman. Forse anche con il Marocco, dove i turisti israeliani già si recavano senza difficoltà prima che si scatenasse il coronavirus. Questo nuovo accordo con gli Emirati non allontanerà la pace con i palestinesi più di quanto non sia già lontana. Al contrario, renderà chiaro ai palestinesi che anche loro devono cambiare corso. Vi sono molte persone di buona volontà sul versante palestinese che capiscono quanto hanno bisogno di un cambiamento, e la loro posizione viene rafforzata da questo accordo con gli Emirati Arabi Uniti e dalle relazioni con altri paesi.

Quindi, in termini storici, la visita israeliana negli Emirati di lunedì e martedì è sicuramente una cosa da festeggiare e c’è solo da augurarsi che arrivino altri giorni come questo.

Source: https://www.israele.net/ben-venga-il-nuovo-medio-oriente

03 Sep 2020
Hurra por el nuevo Medio Oriente

Hurra por el nuevo Medio Oriente

Opinión: Queríamos un cambio en la región y se está gestando ante nuestros ojos. Sin embargo, los detractores, algunos del lado israelí, exigen que sigamos por un camino que les ha fallado a los palestinos durante décadas.

A menudo nos preocupamos por trivialidades en la medida en que luchamos por ver un panorama más amplio.

La visita oficial de la delegación israelí a los Emiratos Árabes Unidos, volando por los cielos de Arabia Saudita en un avión de El Al con permiso del reino, es un día de celebración para Israel.

Queríamos un nuevo Medio Oriente y aquí está, tomando forma ante nuestros ojos.

Nos habría gustado que los palestinos se hubiesen unido a nosotros. Nos habría gustado ver izar banderas israelíes en Ramallah.

Esto aún no ha sucedido, pero tampoco es razón suficiente para lamentar que la bandera israelí “solamente” haya sobrevolado el territorio saudí y no hubiese estado izada sobre él.

Los críticos insisten en que no ha sucedido nada demasiado dramático si se toma en cuenta que Israel ha mantenido vínculos no oficiales durante muchos años con los estados del Golfo.

Ya visité Bahrein y Catar, en la década de 1990, e incluso viajé a Yemen, pero luego estalló la segunda Intifada y todo se detuvo de golpe.

Todos los lazos que estaban abiertos se volvieron encubiertos o simplemente dejaron de existir. Los enemigos de la normalización gobernaban y los palestinos, eternamente obstinados, dictaban políticas.

Los defensores de la normalización han levantado la cabeza, no por su amor por Israel, sino por sus propios intereses.

Esto es maravilloso. Ojalá los palestinos también pudieran unirse y actuar en su propio interés, pero prefieren actuar contra ellos mismos. Se ha convertido en una segunda naturaleza para ellos y, aunque nos duele, a ellos les duele mucho más.

“¿De qué se trata todo este alboroto? Después de todo, los Emiratos Árabes Unidos son una dictadura”, vociferaron algunos críticos.

Encuentro graciosa tal afirmación, ya que fueron los mismos que menospreciaron al ex presidente de los Estados Unidos, George Bush, mientras intentaba difundir el buen evangelio de la democracia y reflexionaba sobre quién lo había puesto a cargo.

Ahora, los eternamente descontentos le están haciendo la misma pregunta a Israel.

Entonces, ¿qué sugieren que hagamos? ¿Romper los lazos con Egipto y Jordania también? Después de todo, tampoco son democracias.

Estas son las mismas personas que se revuelcan en el barro palestino y nos predican sobre la necesidad de reconciliarnos con Hamas, porque esto es importante, y las afirmaciones sobre su falta de democracia son sólo una mala excusa para evitar el compromiso y la paz.

De hecho, tienen un buen punto sobre los palestinos. No deberíamos preocuparnos demasiado por la clasificación de la entidad palestina en la escala de democracia. Así que deberían hacernos un favor a todos y dejar de quejarse de otros regímenes árabes.

¿Es esta tendencia dentro del mundo árabe real, o es simplemente un acuerdo entre líderes que no tiene nada que ver con la opinión pública árabe?

Todavía no hay encuestas que respalden esta suposición, pero el análisis de los medios árabes muestra claramente que algo está sucediendo allí y que no comenzó con el acuerdo entre Israel y los Emiratos Árabes Unidos.

Aquellos que siguieron a la Institución de Investigación de Medios de Medio Oriente (MEMRI) a lo largo de los años saben que es un proceso.

Artículos que no hubiéramos soñado leer hace dos o tres décadas se publican hoy no sólo en sitios que operan en Occidente sino en los principales periódicos de los países árabes.

El destacado periodista saudí Mashari Althaydi escribió que los EAU alcanzaron un “logro histórico”.

El economista yemení Manahel Thabet publicó un artículo elogiando los logros científicos de Israel y pidió a los países árabes que cooperen.

No se están alejando de la causa palestina. Esto es algo mucho más importante. Es un cambio de actitud: paz a través de intereses mutuos y normalización, no mediante boicots.

Los detractores, incluso los de nuestro lado, siguen dando patadas, exigiendo que continuemos por el camino que les ha fallado a los palestinos durante casi un siglo, exigiendo más boicots y obstinación.

Son tan ciegos en su antagonismo hacia Israel que incluso apoyar a la coalición islamista Catar-Turquía-Hamás-Irán les parece normal.

Esto nunca ha funcionado, pero ¿qué diferencia hay? Son tan ciegos en su antagonismo hacia Israel que incluso apoyar a la coalición islamista Catar-Turquía-Hamás-Irán les parece normal.

Necesitamos más avances de este tipo con Sudán y Arabia Saudita, con Bahrein y Omán. Quizás incluso con Marruecos, donde los turistas israelíes ya viajaban sin escalas antes de que golpeara el COVID-19.

Este nuevo acuerdo no alejará más la paz con los palestinos. Todo lo contrario: les dejará claro que también deben cambiar de dirección.

Entonces, en términos históricos, la visita que comenzó el lunes es definitivamente un día festivo y, con suerte, aún están por llegar más días como éste.

Source: http://www.cciu.org.uy/news_detail.php?id=21842

03 Sep 2020
Historischer EL AL-Flug Tel Aviv – Abu Dhabi: EU-Politik und gewisse Medien schweigen

Historischer EL AL-Flug Tel Aviv – Abu Dhabi: EU-Politik und gewisse Medien schweigen

ie Vereinigten Arabischen Emirate (VAE) sind ein kleines, sehr junges Land, Israel ist noch kleiner und nur gut 70 Jahre jung. Was die Aufmerksamkeit in den internationalen Gremien wie UNO und EU anbelangt steht Israel seit Jahrzehnten mit Abstand auf Platz 1. Kein Land wurde von den UN mehr verurteilt als der Staat der Juden. Am Montag den 31. August 2020 – zur Mittagszeit – hätte Israel jede Aufmerksamkeit dieser Welt verdient.

Aber Politik und Medien der DACH-Länder (Deutschland, Österreich und Schweiz) haben sich seltsamerweise verkrochen als eine EL AL- Maschine in drei Stunden und 13 Minuten von Tel Aviv nach Abu Dhabi flog. Der Maschine entstiegen eine israelische Delegation mit dem kippatragenden Sicherheitsberater Meir Ben-Shabbat an der Spitze, der fliessend arabisch spricht. Neben ihm Jared Kushner, der aussenpolitische Berater des US-Präsidenten und der US-Sicherheits-Beauftragte Robert O´Brian. Nur eine einzige, der grossen deutschsprachigen Zeitungen fand angemessene Worte: Die Neue Zürcher Zeitung (NZZ).

ZDF-Heute, ARD-Tagesschau, RTL und die Schweizer Tagesschau SRF fanden in ihren Haupt-Abend-Nachrichten kein Wort für das historische Ereignis in Nahost. Vergeblich suchte man zur Mittagszeit in den Online-Ausgaben von SZ (München), FAZ (Frankfurt), Die Presse Wien und t-online (Berlin, nennt sich gerne die am meisten angeklickte deutschsprachige Nachrichtenseite) eine aktuelle Wortmeldung oder ein Video zur Ankunft der ersten EL AL-Maschine in VAE, die auf dem Flug erstmals saudischen Luftraum nutzen durfte. Ist das Schweigen der EU-Politik und der Medien ein Zufall? Lag gar eine Nachrichtensperre vor?

Es kann nicht sein, was nicht sein darf

Beide Fragen können mit Nein beantwortet werden. Politik und Medien haben sich in den letzten Jahrzehnten in eine Stimmung geschrieben und in Schein-Analysen verbohrt, die eine bekannte Folgeerscheinung zeitigt: es kann nicht sein, was nicht sein darf. Die beiden von der veröffentlichten Meinung längst verurteilten (demokratisch gewählten) Staatslenker Donald Trump und Benyamin Netanyahu haben einen Erfolg vorzuweisen, den keiner ihrer Vorgänger oder gar einer der UN-Generalsekretäre, der EU-Aussenbeauftragten, der Aussenminister in Berlin, London oder Paris geschafft haben. Es muss sie alle so sehr schmerzen, dass es ihnen die Sprache verschlagen hat. Menschlich verständlich.

Politik verursacht Emotionen, aber geführt muss sie werden vor den Fakten der Geschichte, den aktuellen Gegebenheiten und vor allem für die Zukunft der Menschen, die gleichgültig welcher Religion oder Hautfarbe sie angehören und welcher Herkunft sie sind, in Frieden in Freiheit leben wollen. EU-Politiker und die Masse der Medien müssen sich jetzt eingestehen, dass Israel mit Hilfe der USA den Erfolg durch eine Politik der Stärke erzielt hat. Damit ist nicht nur die militärische Stärke gemeint. Israel ist auch eine erfolgreiche Wirtschaftsmacht, die einzige Demokratie im Nahen Osten und spielt auf dem Technologiemarkt der Zukunft auf allen gängigen Feldern wie Trinkwasser-Gewinnung, Daten-Sicherheit, Mobilität und innere Sicherheit weltweit eine führende Rolle.

El Al-Flug ELY971 am 31. August 2020. Der erste kommerziellen Flug zwischen Israel und den Vereinigten Arabischen Emiraten während das Flugzeug den saudi-arabischen Luftraum überfliegt. Foto Screenshot FlightRadar24

Das Team Trump/Netanyahu, das von Journalisten mit fast allen Verbalinjurien belegt worden ist, hat vermeintlich unabdingbare Voraussetzungen für einen Frieden mit den arabischen Nachbarn weggewischt als hätten sie nie existiert: kein Rückzug aus der Westbank, Jerusalem bleibt ungeteilte Hauptstadt Israels, die Golanhöhen sind Bestandteil des Staates Israel, an eine Rückkehr von Palästinensern nach „Palästina“ in Millionenzahl ist nicht zu denken, die Ausgrenzung des Terrorzentrums Gaza ist eine unverbrüchliche Tatsache. Und trotzdem wurden Jared Kusher, Robert O´Brian und Meir Ben-Shabbat mit allen Ehren von VAE-Aussenminster Scheich Abdullah bin Zayed Al Nahyan empfangen.

Was die deutschsprachigen Politiker und Medien nicht über ihre Lippen bekommen, kann man inzwischen in der Presse der arabischen Welt nachlesen. Yousuf Al-Sharif schreibt in Al-Bayan, einer populären Tageszeitung in Dubai aktuell über Israel:

„In den 70 Jahren seit seiner Unabhängigkeit sah sich Israel mehreren Herausforderungen gegenüber: einen Staat zu errichten…und seine Sicherheit inmitten eines historischen Konflikts zu garantieren. Von dieser Erfahrung können wir nur gewinnen und sie in ihrer Tiefe studieren. Dabei sollten wir alle Emotionen und Sympathien für die eine Seite auf Kosten der anderen Seite links liegen lassen.  Israels militärische Verteidigungspläne erlauben es, dem Staat über die gesamte Zeit auf sicheren Beinen zu stehen trotz aller Kriege…die seine Existenz bedrohten. Wir sollten aus dieser Erfahrung unsere Vorteile ziehen und die Geheimnisse des (israelischen) Erfolgs erkunden. In den letzten Jahren litt die Welt unter kontinente-überspannenden Terror, der viele Länder unserer Welt erreichte. Europäische Länder konnten ihre Städte und ihre Bürger nicht schützen…Israels Geimdienste gehören zu den stärksten der Welt und besitzen militärische Technologien, die sie selbst über Jahre entwickelt haben. Aber diese Technologie hat unsere arabischen Staaten, die sie unter den  aktuellen Bedrohungen dringend benötigen, nie erreicht…Wir müssen realistisch erkennen, dass Israel und seine Firmen, die in diesem Bereich aktiv sind, fortgeschrittener sind als andere Firmen weltweit und ihnen um Längen voraus sind. Das bedeutet, dass wir von Beziehungen mit Israel in den kommenden Jahren Vorteile gewinnen können.“

Die jemenitische Wirtschaftsberaterin Manahel Thabet, die in VAE lebt schreibt ebenfalls in Al-Bayan:

„Israel gibt für Forschung und Entwicklung 4,7 Prozent seines Bruttoszialprodukt aus und seine Universitäten gehören zu den besten im internationalen Vergleich… Es verfügt über 55 Einrichtungen der höheren Bildung, darunter acht Universitäten… Wissenschaftliche Forschung konzentriert sich auf die Bereiche Computer, Informatik, Software Industrie, Nuklear-Wissenschaften und die damit verbundene Technologie sowie Weltraum-Forschung, Biologie- und Medizin-Technologie….. Israel ist weltweit führend in deren Produktion und deren Forschung. Israels Wissenschaftler haben 138 881 fundierte Studien in wissenschaftlichen Zeitschriften veröffentlicht….Was die Kluft zwischen Israel und den arabischen Staaten am deutlichsten kennzeichnet, sind 16 805 international erteilte israelische Patente. Die Wirtschaftsberaterin lobt die weise Führerschaft der VAE, die den anti-israelischen Komplex, den viele arabische Gesellschaften plagen, gerade überwindet.“

Keine dahingesagten Freundlichkeiten

Der jahrzehntelang ausgeübte arabische Boykott Israels hat niemand mehr geschadet als den Arabern, schreibt Eglal Gheita, ein ägyptisch-britischer Rechtsanwalt. Die New York Times, alles andere als israel-freundlich, stellt im November 2019 fest, dass immer mehr arabische Intellektuelle, Diplomaten und Journalisten den arabischen Boykott als kontraproduktiv für die arabische Welt betrachten. Zu dieser Gruppe gehören Anwar Sadat, der Enkel des ermordeten ägyptischen Staatspräsidenten, der die Ansicht teilt, dass Isolation und Dämonisierung Israels den arabischen Staaten Milliarden an Handelsvolumen gekostet und der palästinensischen Sache geschadet haben.

Diese Stimmen sind keine dahingesagten Freundlichkeiten. Die Vereinigten Arabischen Emirate – nicht nur sie – stehen vor grossen Herausforderungen. 2014 ist der Ölpreis eingebrochen und hat sich bis heute nicht erholt. Der Reichtum aus dem schwarzen Gold ist Vergangenheit. Die Corona-Pandemie hat den Emiraten allein in diesem Jahr einen 30prozentigen Verlust ihrer Öleinnahmen verursacht. Die weltweit wachsenden erneuerbaren Energien werden den Öl-Scheichtümern niemals mehr die Einnahmen ermöglichen wie im 20. Jahrhundert. Die Scheichs haben verstanden, dass ihre Zukunft jenseits des Öls liegt. Wirtschaftliche Expansion und soziale Sicherheit wird es nur mit Hilfe der Technologien von Morgen geben. Und die heissen: High Tech, Wissenschaft und Verteidigung. Kein Land in der Region kann ihnen das besser liefern als Israel. Und das alles nur drei Flugstunden entfernt.

Source: https://www.audiatur-online.ch/2020/09/02/historischer-el-al-flug-tel-aviv-abu-dhabi-eu-politik-und-gewisse-medien-schweigen/

03 Sep 2020
Supply chains need AI, but AI needs humans

Supply chains need AI, but AI needs humans

The press is full of articles on why businesses need AI because it is expected to make a tremendous impact. The McKinsey Global Institute estimates that by 2030, the additional annual global economic impact will be $13 trillion, a figure that equals about 62 percent of the total current U.S. GDP. Gartner estimates that by the end of 2024, 75 percent of organizations will have moved from merely piloting AI to making it operational, and AI made their list of the Gartner Top 8 Supply Chain Technology Trends for 2020.

AI has made explosive progress since 2012 when a grad student from the University of Toronto won the ImageNet Challenge by a huge margin using deep learning, at the time considered a fringe method. Ever since, deep learning has taken Silicon Valley by storm, and AI has spread into all sectors, including supply chain, to address vexing problems previously considered unattainable. With algorithmic advancements, huge amounts of data and better computing infrastructure, AI has shown promise, making impressive gains in predictive accuracy and speed, far exceeding the cognitive capacity of humans.

The role of humans in AI
But as much as AI is growing in importance to businesses, the role of humans is also more critical than ever. With all the focus on automation (and accompanying fears of job losses), I believe that the idea of a “lights out” or fully autonomous supply chain overemphasizes eliminating the role of the human. We humans are essential to AI because we can provide contextualization, conscience and collaboration.

AI has made tremendous progress but still does not pass the famous Turing Test, devised in 1950 to evaluate whether a machine can think like a human. Examples of areas where machines fail to match our thinking are in understanding cause and effect, reason, and judgement under uncertainty, all of which depend on context.

Humans understand the context
Consider the planning problem of lead times for your average car, which may have more than 30,000 parts. No human has the time or capacity to build a plan that accurately estimates when each of those parts will arrive, so inevitably a planner must guess, resorting to shortcuts, such as assuming related parts from a supplier will have the same lead time, which may not be true. Machine learning can use the historical data to predict what the likely lead time will be, replacing a human’s assumptions and guesses. Combine these 30,000 models with automation and you get the Self-Healing Supply Chain, which can detect variances from plan, auto-correct minor ones and alert the planner to the exceptions for her to address. This kind of application significantly increases accuracy and improves productivity.

But what happens when a disruption shutters plants, delaying the flow of a significant source of these parts? History is no longer an accurate predictor of arrival, throwing a wrench in the machine learning’s algorithmic gears, but a human understands the cause and the effect and can apply reason and judgement under this kind of uncertainty. When lead times are up as much as 200 percent or more, a planner uses her contextual information and abundant domain expertise to make the best decisions possible. When patterns are more reliable, machine learning shifts into gear to provide humans additional insight, but until then, we want to keep the human at the wheel.

Humans have a conscience
Another reason we want humans driving the use of AI is to use our conscience to manage the unintended consequences of AI. McKinsey describes AI as a double-edged sword, given its positive and negative impacts, which are sharper than most new innovations and less well understood. Just a few examples of risks that make headlines are fatal crashes from self-driving cars, job losses from automation, manipulation of political campaigns and state surveillance.

When it works as we want it to, AI can seem like magic, but when it fails us, calls increase for regulation to put the genie back in the bottle. I believe this approach is neither feasible nor desirable. After all, the sharpness of the sword blade applies to positive benefits as well. In addition to the business gains that drive Silicon Valley, there are ample examples of AI for good, from health care to hunger to human rights and more.

Earlier in her career, Dr. Fei-Fei Li invented the ImageNet Challenge mentioned above, but the Stanford professor now leads the Human-Centered AI Institute. She has said, “It’s time to bring AI together with social science, with humanities, to really study the profound impact of AI to our society, to our legal system, to our organizations, to our society to democracy, to education, to our ethics.” Her voice is one of many ensuring we bring conscience to the application of AI, a task only suitable for humans.

Humans know how to collaborate
Finally, humans can collaborate and in ways machines cannot. In fact, some define supply chains by their relationships. Academics Doug Lambert and Matias Enz write: “Thus, supply chain management is actually about relationship management. A supply chain is managed, link-by-link, relationship-by-relationship, and the organizations that manage these relationships best will win.” These relationships work best when the links are connected and all can share the same view of what is happening in the supply chain based on visibility derived from the same data. This visibility allows real-time collaboration to occur when people in different parts of the business can share ideas based on a common understanding of the data, leveraging the wisdom of the crowds.

When a disruption occurs, the linked nature of supply chains means that its impact will not be isolated to one area but will have repercussions across the network. So when lead times are delayed, the pain felt by procurement will also affect production, distribution, sales, etc. If alternate suppliers must be found, solutions should be reached collaboratively by all the parties in the chain. Creating what-if scenarios built on concurrent planning can give the supply chain planner the information she needs to instantly see this impact. But these decisions exist in the context of relationships, which enable the most effective collaboration. Technology can provide a platform to reduce the friction in those relationships, but at the end of the day, humans make relationships work.

Keep the lights on and the human at the center
Intelligent automation from AI can take off people’s plates the mundane tasks that take up time but do not maximize our brains. Increasing our productivity can allow us to focus on what we do best. As much as I believe business needs AI for these kinds of capabilities, I also know that AI needs humans. Our abilities to understand context, provide a conscience and collaborate are not replaceable by machines. Instead of trying to turn out the lights for the grand vision of the autonomous supply chain, we can use AI to shine a light on exceptions so we are augmenting human intelligence, not replacing it. In fact, turn on the lights and get the planner a cup of coffee. AI needs her.

Source: https://www.kinaxis.com/en/blog/supply-chains-may-need-ai-ai-also-needs-humans

02 Sep 2020
How to Eliminate Disruptive Technology’s Risk

How to Eliminate Disruptive Technology’s Risk

Emerging technologies can provide a competitive edge. Yes, risk comes along with those technologies, but there are ways to at least minimize the likelihood.

Disruptive technologies are a double-edged sword. On one hand, successfully implementing the right disruptive technology can lead to significant competitive advantages through innovation. On the other, emerging technologies present potentially unforeseen risks that can lead to high implementation failure rates. Let’s look at how businesses can avoid major pitfalls when selecting the right disruptive technology and how to more accurately time the deployment of high risk, high reward tech projects.

What are disruptive technologies?

The list of disruptive technologies is seemingly without limit. Machine learning, artificial intelligence (AI) and edge computing are three popular examples many companies are considering today. While any technology has the potential to be “disruptive”, some stand out from the others. Truly disruptive technologies are considered innovative and have the potential to dramatically change how a business operates, interacts with customers, or completes the sale of a product or service. These are major evolutions to a business that can create brand-new revenue streams — or help streamline current processes that save time and/or money.

Of course, the catch is that disruptive technologies are known to be both expensive and difficult to implement. If this weren’t the case, everyone would do it. Therefore, it’s important to remember that disruptive technologies are not for the faint of heart. Yet, if properly planned, a successful implementation can be a true game changer.

Find the right technical expertise

One key to a successful disruptive technology implementation is to anticipate potential problems that are likely to emerge during the implementation process. It cannot be stressed enough that you have the right skillset from an IT architecture perspective when planning to integrate disruptive technologies into your infrastructure. This is often where failures happen because the right people aren’t involved at this stage of the game. Two incorrect decisions often occur during the architecture phase. One is to lean on in-house architects to learn the new technology, then come up with an implementation plan to integrate it into an infrastructure they’re very familiar with. The other is to bring in external technical consultants that have a deeper knowledge of the disruptive technology — yet do not have intimate insight into the business’s existing infrastructure architecture.

As you can imagine, a healthy understanding of how technology is used to facilitate current processes combined with a technical background of the emerging technology is beneficial. Thus, implementations are usually more successful when internal and external resources work in tandem to accomplish the same goal. As many of you are probably aware, this is easier said than done. That means it may take some time to find the right external technical resources that mesh well with in-house architecture staff.

Timing the implementation is key

Correctly timing the implementation of a disruptive technology is another critical deployment aspect that often gets overlooked. When dealing with cutting-edge digital tools, there’s a finite timeframe between implementing a technology that’s not quite ready for production and one that’s matured enough to the point where it’s no longer disruptive from a competitive advantage perspective. Unfortunately, there’s no magic ball that can be used to predict the absolute perfect moment to implement these types of technologies. This instead is where a significant amount of research must be put in ahead of time to verify the technology can accomplish exactly what the business requires within the guidelines of a well-established IT roadmap.

IT leadership must also be able to gauge the attitudes of their technical staffers that are tasked with determining when the time is right to strike. Be wary of excessively eager IT architects that try to push for budget approval for a cutting-edge technology. They might simply be looking for a “shiny new toy” to play with.

To fix this issue, it’s imperative that architects be held accountable in some way for the success or failure of a project. Be certain they understand the gravity of the situation and give them plenty of time to deeply consider their opinion prior to seeking full buy-in. This is also another great example of how external technical opinion can be used to help make a final decision. Input from third-party consultants can be a great way to identify potential problems that internal staff may not have fully considered.

Risk can never be fully eliminated

The final point about eliminating risk from disruptive technologies is that it’s impossible to avoid all risk. What can be done, however, is trying to remove as much as humanly possible. By focusing on ensuring you have the right technical skills to evaluate technologies combined with unbiased sources that can accurately judge the readiness capabilities of disruptive tech can go a long way toward a successful implementation.

Source: https://www.informationweek.com/strategic-cio/executive-insights-and-innovation/how-to-eliminate-disruptive-technologys-risk/a/d-id/1338759?