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November 2019 - Dr. Manahel Thabet

Month: November 2019

05 Nov 2019
THIS POWERFUL MORNING PROCESS WILL CHANGE YOUR LIFE – PRE PAVE WITH INTENTION

THIS POWERFUL MORNING PROCESS WILL CHANGE YOUR LIFE – PRE PAVE WITH INTENTION

The most important time… is the time you give to yourself.

And the most important time to do that is first thing in the morning…Because in the morning you set the intention for the rest of your day.

If you jump out of bed late, rushed, stressed, and in your head – that is what you are pre- paving for the rest of your day, and, in the case of most people… the rest of your life: More rush.
More stress.Less living the quality life you deserve.

The key is to get up early enough to allow yourself some time alone. Time to get clear about how you want to feel this day.

Time for intention.Time to get in the energy space of gratitude. Time for meditation.It’s about pre-paving what you want for this day, and your LIFE.

Setting a clear intention and energy, so you attract those things into your experience.

Set the intention for what you want out of the day ahead and get grateful in advance.

This will make sure that you are an energy match to it, and it will soon be in your experience as you are setting the intention for it to be so.

Just go on a rampage of gratitude, of intention and appreciation… It might go something like this:

 

I am grateful today for every moment of calm, every moment of peace, every moment of real connection.
I am grateful for amazing conversations, grateful for every laugh and smile today.
I am grateful for every moment of happiness, especially when I can give that moment to someone else.
I am grateful for every hug. Every kiss. Every moment of real love.
I am grateful for every moment of true presence. When I really feel more connected to everyone and everything around me.

As I am writing these words I am really feeling each moment as if it is really happening, that is perhaps the most important part… The feeling of it.

Putting yourself in that feeling state as if it is really happening. Raising your vibration to that feeling.

Now what that is doing is setting the intention for the day… putting those amazing things in your conscious mind – and so your attention for this day is going to be zeroed in on trying to find and make those things a reality.

This is such a powerful process.

Everything in life is energy. How you show up each day is energy. Your energy is determined by your intention and how you feel.

So make it a priority to feel good.Make it a priority to give yourself time every morning.

Time to meditate, release stress and increase calm.Time in gratitude and pre-paving intention to get in the right energy.

Use whatever words feel natural to you when setting your gratitude intention. Whatever you are really grateful for, and whatever you want to show up in your experience as a FEELING.

Source: https://iamfearlesssoul.com/pre-pave-with-intention/

 

04 Nov 2019
We Need AI That Is Explainable, Auditable, and Transparent

We Need AI That Is Explainable, Auditable, and Transparent

Every parent worries about the influences our children are exposed to. Who are their teachers? What movies are they watching? What video games are they playing? Are they hanging out with the right crowd? We scrutinize these influences because we know they can affect, for better or worse, the decisions our children make.

Just as we concern ourselves with who’s teaching our children, we also need to pay attention to who’s teaching our algorithms. Like humans, artificial intelligence systems learn from the environments they are exposed to and make decisions based on biases they develop. And like our children, we should expect our models to be able to explain their decisions as they develop.

As Cathy O’Neil explains in Weapons of Math Destruction, algorithms often determine what college we attend, if we get hired for a job, if we qualify for a loan to buy a house, and even who goes to prison and for how long. Unlike human decisions, these mathematical models are rarely questioned. They just show up on somebody’s computer screen and fates are determined.

In some cases, the errors of algorithms are obvious, such as when Dow Jones reported that Google was buying Apple for $9 billion and the bots fell for it or when Microsoft’s Tay chatbot went berserk on Twitter — but often they are not. What’s far more insidious and pervasive are the more subtle glitches that go unnoticed, but have very real effects on people’s lives.

Once you get on the wrong side of an algorithm, your life immediately becomes more difficult. Unable to get into a good school or to get a job, you earn less money and live in a worse neighborhood. Those facts get fed into new algorithms and your situation degrades even further. Each step of your descent is documented, measured, and evaluated.

Consider the case of Sarah Wysocki, a fifth grade teacher who — despite being lauded by parents, students, and administrators alike — was fired from the D.C. school district because an algorithm judged her performance to be sub-par. Why? It’s not exactly clear, because the system was too complex to be understood by those who fired her.

Make no mistake, as we increasingly outsource decisions to algorithms, the problem has the potential to become even more Kafkaesque. It is imperative that we begin to take the problem of AI bias seriously and take steps to mitigate its effects by making our systems more transparent, explainable, and auditable.

Sources of Bias

Bias in AI systems has two major sources: the data sets on which models are trained, and the design of the models themselves. Biases in the data sets on which algorithms are trained can be subtle, for example, such as when smartphone apps are used to monitor potholes and alert authorities to contact maintenance crews. That may be efficient, but it’s bound to undercount poorer areas where fewer people have smartphones.

In other cases, data that is not collected can affect results. Analysts suspect that’s what happened when Google Flu Trends predicted almost double as many cases in 2013 as there actually were. What appears to have happened is that increased media coverage led to more searches by people who weren’t sick.

Yet another source of data bias happens when human biases carry over into AI systems. For example, biases in the judicial system affect who gets charged and sentenced for crimes. If that data is then used to predict who is likely to commit crimes, then those biases will carry over. In other cases, humans are used to tag data and may direct input bias into the system.


This type of bias is pervasive and difficult to eliminate. In fact, Amazon was forced to scrap an AI-powered recruiting tool because they could not remove gender bias from the results. They were unfairly favoring men because the training data they used taught the system that most of the previously-hired employees of the firm that were viewed as successful were male. Even when they eliminated any specific mention of gender, certain words which appeared more often in male resumes than female resumes were identified by the system as proxies for gender.

A second major source of bias results from how decision-making models are designed. For example, if a teacher’s ability is evaluated based on test scores, then other aspects of performance, such as taking on children with learning differences or emotional problems, would fail to register, or even unfairly penalize them. In other cases, models are constructed according to what data is easiest to acquire or the model is overfit to a specific set of cases and is then applied too broadly.

Overcoming Bias

With so many diverse sources of bias, we do not think it is realistic to believe we can eliminate it entirely, or even substantially. However, what we can do is make our AI systems more explainable, auditable, and transparent. We suggest three practical steps leaders can take to mitigate the effects of bias.

First, AI systems must be subjected to vigorous human review. For example, one study cited by a White House report during the Obama administration found that while machines had a 7.5% error rate in reading radiology images, and humans had a 3.5% error rate, when humans combined their work with machines the error rate dropped to 0.5%.

Second, much like banks are required by law to “know their customer,” engineers that build systems need to know their algorithms. For example, Eric Haller, head of Datalabs at Experian told us that unlike decades ago, when the models they used were fairly simple, in the AI era, his data scientists need to be much more careful. “In the past, we just needed to keep accurate records so that, if a mistake was made, we could go back, find the problem and fix it,” he told us. “Now, when so many of our models are powered by artificial intelligence, it’s not so easy. We can’t just download open-source code and run it. We need to understand, on a very deep level, every line of code that goes into our algorithms and be able to explain it to external stakeholders.”

Third, AI systems, and the data sources used to train them, need to be transparent and available for audit. Legislative frameworks like GDPR in Europe have made some promising first steps, but clearly more work needs to be done. We wouldn’t find it acceptable for humans to be making decisions without any oversight, so there’s no reason why we should accept it when machines make decisions.

Perhaps most of all, we need to shift from a culture of automation to augmentation. Artificial intelligence works best not as some sort of magic box you use to replace humans and cut costs, but as a force multiplier that you use to create new value. By making AI more explainable, auditable and transparent, we can not only make our systems more fair, we can make them vastly more effective and more useful.

Source: https://hbr.org/2019/10/we-need-ai-that-is-explainable-auditable-and-transparent

03 Nov 2019
AI May Not Kill Your Job—Just Change It

AI May Not Kill Your Job—Just Change It

Don’t fear the robots, according to a report from MIT and IBM. Worry about algorithms replacing any task that can be automated. 

Martin Fleming doesn’t think robots are coming to take your jobs. The chief economist at IBM, Fleming says those worries aren’t backed up by the data. “It’s really nonsense,” he says. A new paper from MIT and IBM’s Watson AI Lab shows that for most of us, the automation revolution probably won’t mean physical robots replacing human workers. Instead, it will come from algorithms. And while we won’t all lose our jobs, those jobs will change, thanks to artificial intelligence and machine learning.

Fleming and a team of researchers analyzed 170 million online US job listings, collected by the job analytics firm Burning Glass Technologies, that were posted between 2010 and 2017. They found that, on average, tasks such as scheduling or credential validation, which could be performed by AI, appeared less frequently in the job listings in the more recent years. The recent listings also included more “soft skills” requirements like creativity, common sense, and judgment. Fleming says this shows that work is being resorted. AI is taking over more easily automated tasks and workers are being asked to do things that machines can’t do.

If you’re in sales, for example, you’ll spend less time figuring out the ideal price for your product, because an algorithm can determine the optimal price to maximize profits. Instead, you might spend more time managing customers or designing attractive marketing materials or websites.

In the study, researchers divided the listings into three groups based on the advertised pay, then examined how different tasks were being valued. What they found is that how we value tasks may be starting to change.

Design skills, for example, were in particularly high demand and increased the most across wage brackets. Within personal care and services occupations—which generally are low-wage—pay for jobs that included design tasks, such as presentation design or digital design, increased by an average of $12,000 over the study period, after inflation. The same can be said of higher wage earners in business and finance who have deep industry expertise that can’t yet be matched by AI. Their wages went up more than $6,000 annually.

Some low-wage occupations like home health care, hairstyling, or fitness training are insulated from the impact of AI because those skills are hard to automate. But middle-wage earners are starting to feel the squeeze. Their wages are still rising, but after adjusting for the shifts in tasks for those jobs, the report found, those wages weren’t growing as quickly as low-wage and high-wage jobs. In some industries, like manufacturing and production, wages actually decreased. There are also fewer middle-wage jobs. Some are getting simpler and being replaced by low-wage jobs. Others now require more skills and are becoming high wage.

Fleming is optimistic about what AI tools can do for work and for workers. Just as automation made factories more efficient, AI can help white-collar workers be more productive. The more productive they are, the more value they add to their companies. And the better those companies do, the higher wages get. “There will be some jobs lost,” he says. “But on balance, more jobs will be created both in the US and worldwide.” While some middle-wage jobs are disappearing, others are popping up in industries like logistics and health care, he says.

As AI starts to take over more tasks, and the middle-wage jobs start to change, the skills we associate with those middle-class jobs have to change too. “I think that it’s rational to be optimistic,” says Richard Reeves, director of the Future of the Middle Class Initiative at the Brookings Institution. “But I don’t think that we should be complacent. It won’t just automatically be OK.”

The report says these changes are happening relatively slowly, giving workers time to adjust. But Reeves points out that while these changes may seem incremental now, they are happening faster than they used to. AI has been an academic project since the 1950s. It remained a niche concept until 2012, when tests showed neural networks could make speech and image recognition more accurate. Now we use it to complete emails, analyze surveillance footage, and decide prison sentencing. The IBM and MIT researchers used it to help sort through all the data they analyzed for this paper.

That fast adoption means that workers are watching their jobs change. We need a way to help people adjust from the jobs they used to have to the jobs that are now available. “Our optimism actually is rather contingent on our actions, on actually making good on our promise to reskill,” says Reeves. “We are rewiring our economy but we haven’t rewired our training and education programs.”

Read more: https://www.wired.com/story/ai-not-kill-job-change-it/

02 Nov 2019
AI Stats News: 64% Of Workers Trust A Robot More Than Their Manager

AI Stats News: 64% Of Workers Trust A Robot More Than Their Manager

Recent surveys, studies, forecasts and other quantitative assessments of the progress of AI highlighted workers’ positive attitudes toward AI and robots, challenges in implementing enterprise AI, the perceived benefits of AI in financial services, and the impact of AI on the business of Big Tech.

AI business adoption, attitudes and expectations

50% of workers are currently using some form of AI at work compared to only 32% last year; workers in China (77%) and India (78%) have adopted AI over 2X more than those in France (32%) and Japan (29%); 65% of workers are optimistic, excited and grateful about having robot co-workers and nearly a quarter report having a loving and gratifying relationship with AI at work; 64% of workers would trust a robot more than their manager and half have turned to a robot instead of their manager for advice; workers in India (89%) and China (88%) are more trusting of robots over their managers, but less so in the U.S. (57%), UK (54%) and France (56%); 82% think robots can do things better than their managers, including providing unbiased information (26%), maintaining work schedules (34%), problem solving (29%) and managing a budget (26%); managers are better than robots in understanding workers’ feelings (45%), coaching them (33%) and creating a work culture (29%) [Oracle survey of 8,370 employees, managers and HR leaders in 10 countries]

The growth of AI applications in deployment was actually less this year than last year, with the total percentage of CIOs saying their company has deployed AI now at 19%, up from 14% last year—far lower than the 23% of companies that thought they would newly roll out AI in 2019 [Gartner]

74% of Financial Services Institutions (FI) executives said AI was extremely or very important to the success of their companies today, while 53% predicted it would be extremely important three years from now; about 75% expected that over the next three years their organizations will gain major or significant benefits from AI in increased efficiency/lower costs; while 61% of FI executives said they knew about an AI project at their companies, only 29% of these executives reported on a project that had been fully implemented; only 29% of AI projects are within full implementation phase, with 46% still pilots, 35% in proof of concept and 24% in initial planning; challenges include securing senior management commitment (45%) and securing adequate budget (44%); technologies used in AI projects include virtual agents (72%) and natural language analysis (56%); 50% found it extremely or very challenging to secure talent and 49% found it extremely or very challenging to attract and retain professionals with appropriate skills [Cognizant survey of FI executives in US and Europe]

82% of CEOs say they have a digital initiative or transformation program, but only 23% think their organizations are very effective at harvesting the results of digital, and even fewer CIOs would say they are very strong at this [Gartner surveys of CEOs and CIOs]

Read more: https://www.forbes.com/sites/gilpress/2019/11/01/ai-stats-news-64-of-workers-trust-a-robot-more-than-their-manager/#777497912b21