Month: April 2019

18 Apr 2019
AI could change the way humans interact

AI could change the way humans interact

In the future, artificial intelligence will probably reshape our economy, society and our lives. But achieving AI’s full potential will not only require many technological innovations but research into some societal difficulties, including ethical issues, workplace disruptions, and changing human interactions.

Sci-fi movies portray artificial intelligence as self-aware computers, evil robots, and digital armageddon. Some fear that in the future, almighty superintelligent AI will far surpass human intelligence, posing an existential threat to humanity. But, the real threat to humanity, said Prof. Christakis, is that “for better and for worse, robots will alter humans’ capacity for altruism, love, and friendship.”

Major innovations have long had an impact on the ways that people interact with each other and the printing press, telephone, radio, TV, and the internet are such technologies.

“As consequential as these innovations were, however, they did not change the fundamental aspects of human behavior that comprise what I call the social suite: a crucial set of capacities we have evolved over hundreds of thousands of years, including love, friendship, cooperation, and teaching…” he wrote.

“But adding AI to our midst could be much more disruptive. Especially as machines are made to look and act like us and to insinuate themselves deeply into our lives, they may change how loving or friendly or kind we are –not just in our direct interactions with the machines in question, but in our interactions with one another.”

Artificial intelligence can both improvise how humans relate to one another as well as make them behave less ethically. 

Experiments with hybrid groups of people and robots working together have shown that the right kind of AI can help improve the group’s overall performance. But, in other experiments, he found that by adding a few bots posing as selfish humans, the same groups that previously behaved in an unselfish, generous way toward each other were now driven by the bots to behave in a selfish way. 

This shouldn’t be surprising, as over the last few years we’ve seen how the spread of false information by malicious bots over social media can have a highly negative, polarizing impact on large groups of people.

“As AI permeates our lives, we must confront the possibility that it will stunt our emotions and inhibit deep human connections, leaving our relationships with one another less reciprocal, or shallower, or more narcissistic,” he writes.

We will be needing rules and policies overlooking to help us deal with potentially negative impacts of AI on society, not unlike how we’ve stopped corporations from polluting our water supply or individuals from spreading harmful cigarette smoke.

“In the not-distant future, AI-endowed machines may, by virtue of either programming or independent learning (a capacity we will have given them), come to exhibit forms of intelligence and behavior that seem strange compared with our own,” concludes Prof. Christakis. “We will need to quickly differentiate the behaviors that are merely bizarre from the ones that truly threaten us.”

Source: https://cio.economictimes.indiatimes.com/news/strategy-and-management/ai-could-change-the-way-humans-interact/68923262

17 Apr 2019

London leads Siemens Atlas of Digitalization as most digitally ready global city

Siemens has launched a new web-based application which reveals the readiness and potential of six major cities to embrace digitalization and develop new ways of living, working and interacting. The Atlas of Digitalization is based around the interconnected themes of Expo 2020 Dubai – Mobility, Sustainability and Opportunity – and assesses how the fourth industrial revolution has already impacted urban life around the world, and the potential it could have in the future.

Data from 21 indicators has been analyzed from Buenos Aires, Dubai, Johannesburg, London, Los Angeles, and Taipei. From this analysis a Digital Readiness Score has been defined, considering areas such as smart electricity and transport systems, internet connections and digital governance services. The score reveals the current level of maturity of each city’s digital infrastructure, and its preparedness for a connected future.

Juergen Maier, CEO Siemens UK said: “It is tremendous that London is leading the charge in digitalization among these global cities. In spite of all the economic uncertainty we have been facing in the UK over the last two years this study shows we are still well placed to achieve leadership globally in the fourth industrial revolution if we continue to invest, innovate and grow responsibly and sustainably.”

“However there is more to the UK economy than London and our Northern cities particularly in the Northern Powerhouse must also benefit from innovation and investment. Each city here in the UK and globally must address its own unique mix of challenges and opportunities by embracing digitalization; the key to sustainable, economically vibrant future cities.”

“The Atlas of Digitalization gives us an insight to the current status of digitalization in global cities, and the data tells us London has already made excellent progress. We hope the Atlas will inspire new ways of thinking to shape all the smart cities of tomorrow and realize the global potential of City 4.0,” added Maier.

Innovation and the environment

The analysis takes into account areas such as innovation, greenhouse gas emissions and time spent in traffic to give the cities a Digital Potential Score, indicating where there is opportunity to grow digital capabilities to transform society and economy. Together, the Readiness and Potential scores illustrate the different capacities each city already has, and where they can develop to effect change and growth.

Visitors to the Atlas of Digitalization can interact with each city and explore its data

The Atlas recognizes London’s advanced implementation of digital technologies in areas such as the introduction of the congestion charge and the Ultra Low Emission Zone which will dramatically cut nitrogen oxide (NOx) emissions. Currently road traffic in London is responsible for more than half of the city’s NOx emissions.

The Atlas also identifies potential for digitalization to positively impact areas in London such as improving mobile internet speeds and opening up new opportunities for internet-enabled services based on the Internet of Things such as ‘vehicle to everything communications’ to improve efficiency.

Mark Jenkinson, City Director, London, at Siemens said: “As part of the Mayor of London’s ‘Smarter London Together’ plan to transform London into the smartest city in the world, the Greater London Authority has set out how they want to collaborate with the capital’s boroughs and services, from Transport for London to the National Health Service: working more effectively with the tech community, universities and other cities to make their vision a reality.”

Data from the 21 indicators has been mapped across three themes: Sustainability, Mobility and Opportunity, creating unique visualization of each city’s digitalization landscape. Visitors to the Atlas of Digitalization can interact with each city and explore its data, taking an in-depth look into how each is addressing its own challenges and opportunities, and how it will impact work and life in future cities.

The Sustainability, Mobility and Opportunity themes are identified by Expo 2020 Dubai as having the power to build partnerships, inspire progress and develop our future cities. Siemens is Infrastructure Digitalization Partner to Expo 2020 Dubai and will use digital solutions to connect, monitor and control buildings at the site using MindSphere, the cloud-based operating systems for the Internet of Things.

Source:
https://workplaceinsight.net/london-leads-siemens-atlas-of-digitalization-as-most-digitally-ready-global-city/

16 Apr 2019
How AI is Revolutionizing Global Logistics and Supply Chain Management

How AI is Revolutionizing Global Logistics and Supply Chain Management

Artificial intelligence is taking up the pace when it comes to global logistics and supply chain management. As per a number of executives from the transportation industry, these fields are expected to go through a more significant transformation. The on-going evolution in the areas of technologies like artificial intelligence, machine learning, and similar new technologies is said to possess the potential to bring in disruption and lead innovation within these industries.

Artificial intelligence comes with computing techniques which helps to select large quantities of data that is collected from logistics and supply chain. You can put such methods to use, and they can be analyzed to get results which can initiate processes and complex functions.

Many organizations have now been benefitted with investments in artificial intelligence. As per Adobe, currently, 15% have already started to use AI while other 31% plans to have them implemented in 2019. Some of the areas from which revenue can be generated are research and development, product innovation, supply chain operations, and customer service.

Impact of artificial intelligence in Logistics

Predictive capabilities will rise.

The efficiencies of the company in the areas of network planning and predictive demand are getting improved with AI capabilities. Companies get to become more proactive by having a tool which can help with capacity planning and accurate demand forecasting. When they know what the market expects, they can quickly move the vehicles to the areas with more demand and thereby bring down the operational costs.

To avoid risks, anticipate events and come up with solutions, now techs are using data. The data helps companies to use their resources in the right way for maximum benefits, and artificial intelligence helps them with it more accurate and faster manner.

Robotics.

You cannot talk about artificial intelligence without mentioning robotics. Even though robotics is considered as a futuristic technology concept, the supply chain already makes use of it. They are used to track, locate and move inventory within the warehouses. Such robots come with deep learning algorithms which helps the robots make autonomous decisions regarding the different processes that are performed in the warehouse.

Big data.

Apart from robots, artificial intelligence is also about big data. For the logistics companies, Big Data helps to optimize future performance and forecast accurate outlooks better than ever. When the insights of Big Data are used along with artificial intelligence, it helps to improve different areas of supply chain like supply chain transparency and route optimization.

For AI in the logistics industry, coming up with clean data is a huge step, and they cannot implement without having such usable figures. It is not easy to measure efficiency as data comes from different sources. At the source level it is not possible to improve such data, and so algorithms are used to analyze data, enhance the quality of data, identify issues to attain transparency which can be used for business benefits.

  Computer vision.

When you are moving cargo across the world, it is always good to have a pair of eyes to monitor, and it can be best when it comes with state-of-the-art technology. Now you can see things in a new way by using computer vision which is based on artificial intelligence for the logistics.

Autonomous vehicles.

Autonomous vehicles are the next big thing that artificial intelligence offers the supply chain. Having driverless trucks can take a while, but the logistics industry is now making use of high-tech driving to increase efficiency and safety. The significant change is expected in this industry in terms of assisted braking, lane-assist, and highway autopilot.

In order to achieve lower fuel consumption, better-driving systems are coming up which works on to bring together multiple trucks to have formations. Computers control such formations and they are connected with one another too. Such kind of configuration is said to help the trucks save fuel distinctively.

Impact of artificial intelligence (AI) in Supply Chain.

AI offers contextual intelligence.

AI provides the supply chain with contextual intelligence which can be used by them to reduce the operating costs and manage inventory. The contextual information helps them to get back to the clients quickly.

Companies make use of AI along with machine learning to get new insights into different areas which include warehouse management, logistics and supply chain management. Some of the technologies used in these areas are AI-powered Visual Inspection to identify damage and carry out needed correction by taking photos of the cargo by using special cameras and Intelligent Robotic Sorting to sort palletized shipments, parcels and letters.

Read more:
https://readwrite.com/2019/04/15/how-ai-is-revolutionizing-global-logistics-and-supply-chain-management/

15 Apr 2019
Faster, more accurate diagnoses: Healthcare applications of AI research

Faster, more accurate diagnoses: Healthcare applications of AI research

When Google DeepMind’s AlphaGo shockingly defeated legendary Go player Lee Sedol in 2016, the terms artificial intelligence (AI), machine learning and deep learning were propelled into the technological mainstream.

AI is generally defined as the capacity for a computer or machine to exhibit or simulate intelligent behaviour such as Tesla’s self-driving car and Apple’s digital assistant Siri. It is a thriving field and the focus of much research and investment. Machine learning is the ability of an AI system to extract information from raw data and learn to make predictions from new data.

Deep learning combines artificial intelligence with machine learning. It is concerned with algorithms inspired by the structure and function of the brain called artificial neural networks. Deep learning has received much attention lately both in the consumer world and throughout the medical community.

Interest in deep learning surged with the success of AlexNet, a neural network designed by Alex Krizhevsky that won the 2012 ImageNet Large Scale Visual Recognition Challenge, an annual image classification competition.

Another relatively recent advancement is the use of graphical processing units (GPUs) to power deep learning algorithms. GPUs excel at computations (multiplications and additions) needed for deep learning applications, thereby lowering application processing time.

In our lab at the University of Saskatchewan we are doing interesting deep learning research related to healthcare applications — and as a professor of electrical and computer engineering, I lead the research team. When it comes to health care, using AI or machine learning to make diagnoses is new, and there has been exciting and promising progress.

Extracting blood vessels in the eye

Detecting abnormal retinal blood vessels is useful for diagnosing diabetes and heart disease. In order to provide reliable and meaningful medical interpretations, the retinal vessel must be extracted from a retinal image for reliable and meaningful interpretations. Although manual segmentation is possible, it is a complex, time-consuming and tedious task which requires advanced professional skills.

My research team has developed a system that can segment retinal blood vessels simply by reading a raw retinal image. It is a computer-aided diagnosis system that reduces the work required by eye-care specialists and ophthalmologists, and processes images 10 times faster, while retaining high accuracy.

Read more:
https://theconversation.com/faster-more-accurate-diagnoses-healthcare-applications-of-ai-research-114000

14 Apr 2019
Investment to rise in digital economy as e-commerce booms globally

Investment to rise in digital economy as e-commerce booms globally



A softer global economy, trade tensions and protectionism are hampering financial exchange and returns on foreign direct investments.

However, the global digital economy is on the rise and technology is certainly an avenue for FDI going forward, government officials, policymakers and bankers say.

“There is a decline in return in FDI and, more importantly, we are seeing trade tensions translating into investment protectionism, which explains slackening, almost stalling, of traditional financial flows in investment and trade [globally],” Mukhisa Kituyi, secretary general, United Nations Conference on Trade and Development, said yesterday.

Conversely, the economy 4.0 – often a reference to digital and data driven sectors such as e-commerce – is on the rise. Between 2015 and 2017, the value of global e-commerce trade rose to $9 trillion (Dh33.06tn) from $6tn. Two years ago, about 1.3 billion people across the globe were shopping online with 1 per cent purchasing goods from abroad and that ratio has gone up to 15 per cent, he said.

There is phenomenal growth in trade and e-commerce as digital giants such because Google and Amazon can mine and monetise data, which has enabled them to overcome hurdles associated with the traditional analogue economy.

“This resulted in a massive expansion in the data economy at a time when traditional economies and [foreign direct] investments are slowing down,” Mr Kituyi told the ninth Annual Investment Meeting in Dubai.

Abdullah Al Nuaimi, UAE Minister of Infrastructure and Development said the UAE, which is at the forefront of the digital economic revolution in the broader Middle East, is also inviting more foreign investments into technologies that could help narrow the divide between the digital and analogue economies.

“The UAE believes in the importance of technology as a major catalyst for economic growth and has been keen to keep abreast of new trends and their application in various areas [of trade and economy], he told the AIM conference, which brought together senior government officials, bankers, investors and the global corporations from more than 140 countries.

The Emirates, the second-biggest economy in the Arabian Gulf, ranks first in the region in terms of FDI inflows, which in 2018 amounted to $10.4bn, the minister said, citing estimates by the Central Bank.

“Our outlook for the future remains optimistic,” Mr Al Nuaimi said. “The UAE has paid great attention to the development of infrastructure and roads, being aware of its importance in promoting investments [in the country]”.

While the developed nations transition to economy 4.0, governments and the private sector will have to work to protect both developing and emerging economies, by building solid policy frameworks and regulations, Mr Kituyi said.

“The world cannot afford to make the mistakes made in globalisation, leaving market forces on their own to fix the problems,” he said. “Developing countries need to identify the gap in their digital divide, what are their data protection and privacy laws and how are they bridging the gap of talent in the digital age.”

While many believe that the rise of digitalisation of the global economy will result in job losses, Ayman Sejiny, executive officer of Islamic Corporation for the Development of the Private Sector, said that is more myth than reality.

“You hear a lot of news that economy 4.0 is going to eliminate a lot of jobs, but it is going to create a lot of jobs as well and it will be much faster [job creation] in my opinion,” he said. “Once you have more productivity and an efficient supply chain, and understand where the demand is, businesses will be flourishing much faster. Hence, we will be experiencing a better jobs market.”

His sentiment was echoed by the Adnan Chilwan, the group chief executive of Dubai Islamic Bank, the biggest Sharia-compliant lender in Dubai, who said a more efficient banking industry will result in increased profitability. This, in turn, will allow the banks to move in to other markets where they will be creating more jobs.

“Digitisation is here to stay. It is part of the new economy,” he said.

Source:
https://www.thenational.ae/business/economy/investment-to-rise-in-digital-economy-as-e-commerce-booms-globally-1.846553



13 Apr 2019

Why Has It Become Risky To Be An AI-Based Software Startup?

In the last two decades, the software industry provided a healthy breeding ground for incubating new businesses and ideas. From solving the day-to-day problems of end-users to building complementary tools for software developed by large companies, startups thrive in the disruptive market. They compete to differentiate based on the value they deliver to customers.

But the changing dynamics of the industry have made it extremely risky to be an independent software vendor or a startup in the cloud and AI market.

There was a time when large platform companies delivering enterprise software chose not to compete with ISVs. The primary reason for this move was to let the partners survive while focusing on solving complex problems for enterprise customers. For example, many companies were complementing Microsoft Office suite through additional tools and plugins. Microsoft enabled and encouraged the ecosystem to grow around the office platform which directly helped the industry. Same was the case with Oracle and SAP when they shipped shrink-wrapped enterprise software while closing million-dollar licensing deals.

The other reason that influenced the growth of 3rd party ISVs was that the large platform companies were secretive of their differentiating factor. The secret sauce provided by internal research teams was used to improve the products and platforms but was never directly exposed to customers. Startups could deliver a less sophisticated version of the same feature as a standalone product for an affordable price. Multiple software components that were embedded in enterprise software were available from ISVs for a price. Enterprise software companies never bothered to productize those features as standalone products as they wanted to stay focused on the larger platform than spreading themselves too thin.

Read more: https://www.forbes.com/sites/janakirammsv/2018/12/23/why-has-it-become-risky-to-be-an-ai-based-software-startup/#624cb97f469d 

11 Apr 2019
Manahel Thabet

Disruptive technology to play key role in changing UK energy sector

Law firm Addleshaw Goddard has reported that disruptive technology will be a key factor of the energy sector in Britain over the coming years.

The report, entitled Disruption in Great Britain’s Energy Market, cites two other factors as the carbon agenda and increased customer engagement.

It states that while $107bn (£82bn) was invested in renewable generation assets between 2013 and 2017, there has also been a surge in spending on new technology.

The ‘energy trilemma’ – affordability, safety and security – can be dealt with by the growth of renewables as well as improved electric vehicle infrastructure, demand-driven smart meters and blockchain, which contribute to the move toward a decentralised energy system.

However, increased renewable use will also present challenges, says Addleshaw Goddard, since while sources like wind and solar are stable, they can also be intermittent and less reliable.

Paul Dight, energy partner at Addleshaw Goddard, said: “The government faces a significant challenge in creating a dynamic energy market that can successfully move the country away from a top-down centralised system and fully accommodate the spectrum of green and disruptive technologies into the energy generation mix… If this is going to be achieved, innovative disruptors in the market have a key role to play.

“In much the same way technology and innovation has had a transformative effect on sectors such as retail, so it can have a similar effect in the energy sector. Indeed, it must do if we are to tackle the trilemma of providing the affordable, secure and sustainable energy generation the country needs.”

Speaking exclusively to Energy Digital, Dight added: “Disruption in the energy industry is happening at many levels, and the huge increase in renewables over recent years, innovations in technology and consumers taking a much more active interest, are going to have a huge impact on the sector.

“It’s a landscape that is shifting continually and the goal posts can change very quickly. Even milestones we believe to be set, such as the government’s commitment to ban petrol and diesel cars by 2040, can prove to be indefinite.

“Yesterday, parliament’s Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy committee called for the ban to be brought forward eight years to 2032 – and for investment into the infrastructure needed to incorporate the widespread use of electric vehicles to be prioritised. It’s seismic changes such as this that provide huge opportunities and challenges for everyone in the sector.

“It was great to see the Low Carbon Contracts Company confirm earlier today that almost all of the projects awarded contracts for difference in the second CfD allocation round have passed their first milestone. And whilst this is great news for Great Britain as we continue to build our low carbon future, this means there will be more intermittent renewable generation within the power mix, which will further disrupt the sector.

“As we look ahead, one of the most interesting developments to monitor in the sector will be how established suppliers respond to the gauntlet thrown down by challenger suppliers embracing smart disruptive technology. To retain their market share, traditional suppliers will need to innovate much more, investing in technology that shifts the way suppliers engage with customers – putting them at the heart of what they do.”

10 Apr 2019

You Have No Idea What Artificial Intelligence Really Does

WHEN SOPHIA THE ROBOT first switched on, the world couldn’t get enough. It had a cheery personality, it joked with late-night hosts, it had facial expressions that echoed our own. Here it was, finally — a robot plucked straight out of science fiction, the closest thing to true artificial intelligence that we had ever seen.

There’s no doubt that Sophia is an impressive piece of engineering. Parents-slash-collaborating-tech-companies Hanson Robotics and SingularityNET equipped Sophia with sophisticated neural networks that give Sophia the ability to learn from people and to detect and mirror emotional responses, which makes it seem like the robot has a personality. It didn’t take much to convince people of Sophia’s apparent humanity — many of Futurism’s own articles refer to the robot as “her.” Piers Morgan even decided to try his luck for a date and/or sexually harass the robot, depending on how you want to look at it.

“Oh yeah, she is basically alive,” Hanson Robotics CEO David Hanson said of Sophia during a 2017 appearance on Jimmy Fallon’s Tonight Show. And while Hanson Robotics never officially claimed that Sophia contained artificial general intelligence — the comprehensive, life-like AI that we see in science fiction — the adoring and uncritical press that followed all those public appearances only helped the company grow.

But as Sophia became more popular and people took a closer look, cracks emerged. It became harder to believe that Sophia was the all-encompassing artificial intelligence that we all wanted it to be. Over time, articles that might have once oohed and ahhed about Sophia’s conversational skills became more focused on the fact that they were partially scripted in advance.

Read more: https://futurism.com/artificial-intelligence-hype

09 Apr 2019
Wealth Managers Need to Re-Think Digitalization

Wealth Managers Need to Re-Think Digitalization

Wealth management clients are not as tech-phobic as the average wealth manager believes, concluded a study conducted by Scorpio Partnership and sponsored by FactSet.

When the research and analysis firm surveyed 877 UK- and US-based wealth management clients, it found that the appetite for digital interactions ran a spectrum.

The average survey respondent was 37 and described themselves as an early adopter or a technology follower and mirrored the technology adoption traits of millennials.

They’re interested in the digital experience, but it has to be engaging and worth something and not a reheated version of what they can get from a different channel, according to Tasha Vashisht, a senior manager at Scorpio Partners during a recent webinar.

“However, they have high expectations,” she said. “They probably will wait and try again if they have a disappointing experience.”

She cited an unnamed wealth manager that posted amount updates online and saw little uptake since the wealth manager already provided the same information through an already existing channel.

“Clients need a reason to log on,” said Vashisht.

Unfortunately for wealth managers, there is no “one size fits all” approach for which content will draw clients online.

What attracts the mass affluent client may not be the same that would attract ultra-high net worth clients.

The most straightforward approach to deploying a digitalization strategy is to ask clients what they want, she said.

Each wealth manager needs a custom digitalization strategy, which could be segmented into onboarding, execution/trade, and dealing with client requests.

One area that wealth managers could stress online is investor education, according to Vashisht. Ultra-high net worth holdings and financial sophistication do not always go hand in hand.

“Year-on-year clients are struggling with basic vocabulary like ‘volatility’ and where risk sits in their portfolios,” she said.

There is no one way to implement a digital strategy, “but as long as you have the internal focus, you are fine,” added fellow presenter Philipp Zerhusen, director of market development at FactSet.

Such programs do not need massive budgets and firms can turn to third-party providers, he added.

Source: https://www.marketsmedia.com/wealth-managers-need-to-re-think-digitalization/

08 Apr 2019
Industry is where the real potential of AI lies

Industry is where the real potential of AI lies

Assembly robots that build things on their own without having been programmed to do so. Self-optimizing production lines in factories. Trains and wind turbines requesting maintenance based on operational data and artificial intelligence (AI) that can predict behaviour better than the engineers who designed and built the systems can. These developments are a real opportunity if we come up with ideas on how to shape AI and make it a job engine.

It’s beyond question that the world of work will continue to change with the ascendancy of AI. Today, robots still have to be content with the so-called “3 ‘D’ jobs” – tasks that are dumb, dirty and dangerous.

According to recent studies on the future of work, however, this restriction will soon be overcome. By the year 2030, up to 375 million people worldwide will have to learn a new profession. This corresponds to one out of every three employees. And displacement won’t just impact those who perform so-called “simple” tasks, but also lawyers, doctors and engineers.

Forecasts from leading market research companies unanimously confirm that the activities accounting for up to 50% of most tasks can be automated. Machines could not only perform these activities but also complete them better and faster than humans can. The upside? Relieved of the drudgery of such tasks, we’ll have more freedom to assess the results obtained, advise customers and patients, or recognize and foster our employee’s abilities.

Read more: https://www.weforum.org/agenda/2019/01/industry-is-where-the-real-potential-of-ai-lies/